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Would you be so kind

would you be so kind

Entdecken Sie Would You Be So Kind von dodie bei Amazon Music. Werbefrei streamen oder als CD und MP3 kaufen bei cippus.se Okt. Mir fällt nur auf, dass die direkte Übersetzung von "Would you please be so kind as to [do this/that]" im Deutschen doch ebenso unhöflich klingt. Many translated example sentences containing "would you be so kind and answer" – German-English dictionary and search engine for German translations.

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Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. See all customer images. Read reviews that mention lena dunham kind of girl show girls young woman love lena felt like new york tiny furniture year old great read read this book well written waste your time easy read amy poehler mindy kaling laugh out loud tina fey sense of humor loved this book.

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Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. Before reading this book, I thought Lena Dunham could do no wrong. I love all three seasons of Girls, I've bought magazines I'd never previously read simply because she graced their covers, and I've read all of her online essays.

This book is, however, too much Lena. While there are flashes of brilliance in the book, like the essays on the hard-to-define rape she suffered, the teacher who tried to sexually abuse her, and the struggles she's had with being taken seriously by male execs in Hollywood, the majority of the book is filled with musings about her life that are simply boring.

I get that Lena believes that standing up and telling your story is the bravest thing anyone can do, but your story has to be interesting in order to be worthy of being published.

That's where this book has gone wrong--the publisher clearly thought that anything written by Lena would be lapped up by readers.

With each individual essay, her editors clearly didn't step back and ask, 'Is this really worth publishing? If they had, the book would be about two-thirds shorter.

The title is also misleading, as Lena does not appear to have learned very much, or rather, she doesn't take much interest in imparting her knowledge to her readers.

This book has primarily taught me that Lena Dunham is excruciatingly self-obsessed and lacking virtually any self-awareness. She appears to believe that her musings on virtually anything are nothing short of brilliant, no matter how dull and irrelevant the subject matter.

The reprinting of several pages of her food diary is perhaps the best illustration of this --a verbatim regurgitation of what she ate for about a week while she was allegedly on a 'diet' it's really just a pretty standard day's eating for most people is supposed to communicate what exactly?

Her attempts to make even the most mundane interactions with her family appear so powerfully meaningful are odd. The part where she retells a story about how she and her father got stuck in a traffic jam and experienced frustration because, well, they were in a traffic jam is a perfect example of this.

In this book, Lena seems consumed by a pressing need to convince you that she feels so many more emotions, so much more intensely than anyone else.

She sees quirks and eccentricities in people that others simply cannot comprehend, and you, the reader, need to know that.

She is just so brilliant, you guys, don't you see that from all of her deep introspections on how we're all going to die eventually so what's the point?!

Lena is so overwhelmed by herself in this book that you can't help but feel like you're suffocating while reading it. This book has killed my love affair with all things Lena Dunham.

I admire the work she has done in film and television, no question, and she's an extremely talented writer in both of those genres.

I don't think, however, that she can write at the level required to sustain an entire book. I will view Lena Dunham from afar from now on.

I've thrown out all of those once-hoarded magazines, and although I still love Girls and will await every new season with much anticipation, I'll watch it from now on with a degree of detachment.

I love "Girls" and Lena. I wanted to like this book. There are amazing sentences, but it is not good overall. I stopped reading it. This same friend believes her problems would be solved if people just got her intelligence, understood her uniqueness, surrendered to her self-awareness.

Eh, I love Lena Dunham but I expected something deeper and more intriguing. I can listen to any random girl on the street tell me about how her middle school boyfriend was weird and she gets annoyed with her family sometimes I know she has it in her to provide that sort of insight but it just didn't come through here.

Throughout, it is just her saying uncomfortable things nobody wants to hear about her. You would expect it to be funny, but it is not at all.

I admit I went into this with a bias. Not necessarily against Lena Dunham but I consider myself an overwhelmingly private person.

I really don't understand some people's need these days not just to share some things with some people but to share absolutely every thought that comes into their head and in this case things that come into their body with everyone in the world and think pretty highly of themselves while doing it.

In a sense the book changed my opinion of Lena Dunham personally. She's a talented writer and this is an easy read- I even laughed out loud in a couple of places and found some common ground with her.

I too have OCD and as a child used to be afraid to fall asleep. But that's about it. Some of the stuff she shared was cringe-worthy for someone like me.

The rape chapter is one I kept going back to as well. No one knows what happened that night and obviously it was something bad but the way she begins the chapter by stating she's an unreliable narrator bugged me.

She talks to in another part about how she steals other people's stories and memories. Considering the rest of the book I almost wish she had addressed the rape in a different format.

And in all honesty there was so much in the book that I found almost nothing to be meaningful or deep. In fact it felt like she was trying so hard to make seem meaningful that it made it harder to like.

So long story short I like Lena Dunham a lot more after reading her book I just think the book itself was kind of pointless and a little too self aware.

And strangely for everything in the book and you will come away knowing more about her lady parts than anything else I feel like I know Lena Dunham better after reading one single and completely tasteful interview with her mother.

I get it you where brought up privileged but you come off as if everything you say is important and the truth.

I was a fan but you come off as entitled and whiny. See all 1, reviews. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

Think of how they do it in movies; you may see the killer snipping letters out of newspapers for his ransom note, but never see his face until the end.

You enjoy guessing his identity based on the other clues you see, rather than feeling like someone is intentionally hiding something from you.

A few other people have mentioned that. Wow Stephanie, this post certainly has legs: You are right to say that 2nd person is difficult to work with.

I started a novel in which I wanted to make the reader the killer, but I gave it up as too contrived. Do you think, however, that the most successful use of the unreliable narrator comes when the reader is frequently directly addressed by the narrator?

Not necessarily; I think the unreliable narrator is more likely to be lying about himself or other characters than around the reader.

It could work well whether or not he refers to the reader directly. More and more links Pearltrees. Is there a type or sub-type where you write from past to future or even future to past!

Or is that the Unreliable Narrator one? Hi Guys, I need help and lots of it. My question is can I have the narrator be the young adult in the first chapter without revealing who she is?

Meaning, can my narrator be totally uninvolved with the other characters? Do I have to tell the readers who my narrator is? Hi Tina, Sounds interesting!

My answers are yes, yes, and no. But it sounds like you want her to be a character, just not a character in the main story.

I am toying with having the boat be the narrator — When they first find the boat, it is in poor condition, but they fix her up and set off down the coast.

Over the next 2 years the they encounter may obstacles while he guys work to raise money, and learn how to repair her and what changes need to be made to make her faster etc….

The boat as narrator is a fascinating idea, but it would be tricky, and might strike too whimsical a tone for a true story. First person — from your own perspective.

Sort of half-scrapbook, half-memoir, with quotes from your father as well as your own personal thoughts about the story and why you want to tell it.

How does the story exemplify your dad as you know him? How did it change your perspective of your father?

I am not sure if this is ever noted or discussed in literary circles, but I have observed that there is a fuzzy kind of category of third person narrator somewhere between omniscient and the usual sense of limited, and I would love to know if there is a standard name or discussion of it.

What I noticed is that a third person omniscient narrator is supposed to know everything that is happening on all sides AND everything that all the characters are thinking.

However, although many perhaps most third person omniscient narrators will frequently shift from place to place, showing what is happening to different characters, and what different characters are thinking, they will typically limit themselves to the thoughts of a single character at a time — they will not typically shift from head to head in a single scene.

As I said, I think this may actually be the more common case, because I did not even become aware of the distinction until I encountered a book in which the narrator did provide insights into the thoughts of several characters in rapid succession, which I found to be rather disorienting.

Perhaps someone could let me know if a term already exists for this? If not, may I suggest third person flexible indicating a partially limited narrator whose limited viewpoint periodically shifts?

It can be hard to tell who is thinking what. The voices and camera angles differentiate them there. Cass — sannidavidyr3. How to Fix Your Writing Part 2: Narration — Little Siberia.

Thanks for the info it was great for 1 of my classes and its was great with my teacher helping me find this.

Haha, i thought my story was fated to be doomed because i used a weird narrator! This room is pretty boring.

White walls, a pimple looking ceiling light, and wooden floors that are probably not even real wood. On a somewhat unrelated note, is there a specific name for the way Jane Austen wrote or the narrative techniques she used?

For example, from Sense and Sensibility: Sir John could not have thought it possible. Such a good-natured fellow!

He did not believe there was a bolder rider in England! It was an unaccountable business. He wished him at the devil with all his heart.

He would not speak another word to him, meet him where he might, for all the world! No, not if it were to be by the side of Barton covert, and they were kept waiting for two hours together.

Such a scoundrel of a fellow! She short of summarizes, or paraphrases, maybe? Thank you so much for this article!

I even stopped writing for a couple of days. Should I use most of the styles in my creation, coz it makes me easy to communicate with readers?

For number six, I was like: Can you name any good examples of getting around this problem? You can use the best adsense alternative for any type of website they approve all websites , for more details simply search in gooogle: Your email address will not be published.

Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. The 7 Narrator Types: Photo by Charles Hutchins. About Stephanie Orges Stephanie is an award-winning copywriter, aspiring novelist, and barely passable ukulele player.

Here, she offers writing prompts, tips, and moderate-to-deep philosophical discussions. Stephanie Orges September 23, at Writer of Riders June 21, at 6: Stephanie Orges June 21, at 7: Which thing is that?

Brigitta M January 15, at Stephanie Orges January 17, at 8: Blanca Ramirez December 13, at 5: Not what i wanted Reply.

Drew Lane Composer September 10, at 6: Story Sage June 23, at 2: Stephanie Orges June 24, at 9: You should give it a go! You may be surprised.

Paul February 21, at 8: Stephanie Orges February 24, at Thanks for those examples! Tom McCranie October 2, at 3: Thank you for your thought provoking and information laden newsletter.

Thanks for spreading the word! I use the Interviewer myself! Gus Sanchez September 10, at 9: Rod Griffiths November 27, at 9: Stephanie Orges December 1, at MJI December 18, at 9: Jerry Slauter March 22, at 3: Stephanie Orges March 22, at 9: Matt Smith April 15, at 2: Welp, thanks for ruining then end of series of unfortunate events… Reply.

Stephanie Orges April 15, at Izzi Skyy May 28, at Stephanie Orges May 31, at 5: Awesome example; thank you! Eric October 18, at Is this an example of an unreliable narrator?

Stephanie Orges October 18, at 8: Sunny October 26, at 2: Stephanie Orges October 26, at 6: Sounds like a great example! Stephanie February 14, at Stephanie Orges February 15, at Or maybe your narrator was secretly Subplot all along???

Bryan Ens April 9, at 2: Stephanie Orges April 14, at 9: Writer November 17, at Stephanie Orges November 17, at 6: That sounds like a LOT of fun!

Gila November 25, at Stephanie Orges December 1, at 9: Barabi January 19, at Stephanie Orges January 19, at 5: One of my favorite kinds of narrator!

They are SOO much fun. Elizabeth March 26, at 9: Georgia April 30, at 7: June 26, at I appreciate this list. Stephanie Orges June 29, at 8: Sarah Taylor June 29, at 2: What about 2nd person…?

Robert Blanchett August 12, at 7: The idea of 10 narrators is a bit mind-blowing. Stephanie Orges August 17, at 7: Billybob Smith September 2, at 1: Maggie November 13, at 3: Tina January 3, at 5: Stephanie Orges January 4, at 7: Lisa February 2, at Over the next 2 years the they encounter may obstacles while he guys work to raise money, and learn how to repair her and what changes need to be made to make her faster etc… Reply.

Stephanie Orges February 8, at 8: Matthew Nace March 24, at 5: Stephanie Orges March 28, at 7: Danielis September 20, at 2: Shawn Davis November 2, at 1: Thanks for the info it was great for 1 of my classes Reply.

Ivetta "Sam" January 17, at 7: Stephanie Orges January 23, at 5: Bella February 2, at I like this website Reply.

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Vielleicht könntest du dich eingangs selbst vorstellen und uns erzählen, wie du Autorin geworden bist?. Suggestions Ich wäre Ihnen sehr dankbar, wenn Sie Manchmal kann man auch direkt nachfragen, in Exberliners Fall sicherlich da geht es ja um einen Kollegen: Registration and use of the trainer are free of charge. Herr Jüngling, ich würde mich freuen, wenn Sie spontan den Satz beenden: Können Sie uns bitte Ihre Antwort in folgenden Sprache zusenden:. Francis, würdest du so freundlich sein , uns reinzulassen? Sara war so nett und hat mir ein paar Fragen über sich und ihre Erfahrungen mit Haien beantwortet. Übersetzung Wörterbuch Rechtschreibprüfung Konjugation Synonyme. Würden Sie so freundlich seinMadame, für golden river casino online als Zeugin auszusagen? Schär übernimmt gegenüber Benutzern und anderen Drittparteien jedoch keinerlei Verantwortung für Verzögerungen, Ungenauigkeiten, Fehler oder Auslassungen, die sich aus solchen Inhalten ergeben. Wie kann ich Übersetzungen in den Vokabeltrainer übernehmen? Haben Free slot games 4u Vorschläge oder Anregungen, wie ein solches Netzwerk gestaltet werden könnte? This letter will be sent in the mother tongue of the campsite. Would you be interested in working with us within a network of this kind? This may increase Beste Spielothek in Körndlhof finden chances of catching the attackers. Haben Sie Vorschläge oder Anregungen, wie ein solches Netzwerk gestaltet werden könnte?. Schär übernimmt gegenüber Benutzern und anderen Drittparteien jedoch keinerlei Verantwortung für Verzögerungen, Ungenauigkeiten, Fehler oder Auslassungen, die sich beste handelsplattform solchen Inhalten ergeben. Ich wäre dankbar, wenn Sie diesem Beste Spielothek in Obermühle finden so bald wie möglich nachkommen könnten.

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I love how you sort out the different points of view and give examples for us more visual learners. I, myself, prefer the first-person or third-person limited, although I have been tempted to play around with the unreliable narrator just to see what happens.

I will be citing your helpful information in my post. Great post — thanks! My personal favourite is the unreliable narrator… they are the best fun to create.

I often write my first draft in first person and then change to Limited. My most recent attempt started in first and then changed to Limited.

As a writing exercise, I tried a very short story in second person and found it very difficult. Yeah, I considered mentioning 2nd, but it is so rare and limiting, I decided not to.

The Choose Your Own Adventure books are one example, and as writingsprint mentions above, Bright Lights, Big City is apparently entirely second person.

Trying to write my novella in the first person past tense…although it is getting harder to keep from revealling things the character knows because of his timeline, and the reader finding out too much of the story to make it uninteresting.

May go to seperate styles in each chapter instead… too much to think about, too many styles to try.

My WIP uses the Interviewer. The unreliable narrator is actually kind of fun to write. The best example of the unreliable narrator is Raskolnikov Crime and Punishment.

Though I suppose a first-person omniscient would be a fascinating narrator! I am currently writing what I hope will be a novel.

The character concerned is a ghost and sees into everyone. As I may submit this for my MA I would be interested to know of other first person omniscient stories.

In each case a somewhat unusual narrator, but judging by the sales of those books it can work. Unusual narrators are the best!

After writing a number of rough drafts 3rd person limited and third person Omni, it felt too detached and lacking the feel of 1st person I really enjoyed with even older drafts.

He can also make comparisons if things have been altered and not playing as he remembers them. I find this a bit strange and a bit of a challenge, but fun nonetheless.

Antonio Salieri was played by f. How could Lemony be writing the story if he died??? When I do give away the endings of things, I always try to give fair warning with spoiler alerts.

Notes from Underground is also separated into two halves: It sailed a hundred yards through the air and went down a rabbit-hole, and in this way the battle was won and the game of Golf invented at the same time moment.

One of my favorite quotes from The Hobbit! And yes, I think it can be an example of an unreliable narrator — as someone who is perhaps telling a tall tale though who are we to say what really happens in Middle Earth?

Thanks for commenting with that! Guys, I really need your help. I am writing a story in 3rd person. She goes in flashback mode and tells the story.

However in flashback-I have two characters-Mom herself and a subplot character. Please suggest how to do this?

Thanks a lot for your help!!! It will depend on how much of the story is in each POV. The trick is to think of your third person narrator as a character, too.

How does he know all these stories and why does he care? The narrator could be an existing character — the daughter, perhaps. She could be recording what her mother is telling her, and she could also interview Mr.

Subplot for his story. Could make a cool plot twist, even. The narrator could be a new character you create who knows Mom, daughter, and Subplot.

Someone in the position to learn their stories. For a good example of layered narration, check out some of P. They all start with a first person narrator sitting in a pub.

Mulliner is also in the pub, and starts telling a story about one of his relatives, for which he usually switches into third person. You can read one free here , although the weird formatting makes it difficult.

Looks like Writingspring already said what I was going to mention…2nd person narrative. These were written in 2nd person.

I loved Choose Your Own Adventure books! Somehow I always ended up dying somehow, though. Second person is definitely worth a mention, albeit difficult to pull off in long form prose.

Admittedly, though, the more I think about it, the more I want to try it! I might still categorize my newest work as First Person, but with a twist you may find interesting.

My main character suffers from Multiple Personality Disorder. Thank you for writing this! The whole story is like his confessional, and his sly narrative comments gradually reveal how everything started because of his own actions.

Stephanie Orges for sharing this list with us. I feel like I want the narrator to be able to give fine details on the thoughts and feelings of all the characters as it will give them greater depth and paint a clearer picture of the world, so omnicient seems the obvious choice.

My gut feeling is to switch to a first person narration only by my main character and only briefly, when it best suits the advancement of the story.

Anyone else have suggestions? Switching between first and third person can be tricky and confusing, unless you have a specific in-story explanation for why it switches.

Think of how they do it in movies; you may see the killer snipping letters out of newspapers for his ransom note, but never see his face until the end.

You enjoy guessing his identity based on the other clues you see, rather than feeling like someone is intentionally hiding something from you.

A few other people have mentioned that. Wow Stephanie, this post certainly has legs: You are right to say that 2nd person is difficult to work with.

I started a novel in which I wanted to make the reader the killer, but I gave it up as too contrived. Do you think, however, that the most successful use of the unreliable narrator comes when the reader is frequently directly addressed by the narrator?

Not necessarily; I think the unreliable narrator is more likely to be lying about himself or other characters than around the reader.

It could work well whether or not he refers to the reader directly. More and more links Pearltrees.

Is there a type or sub-type where you write from past to future or even future to past! Or is that the Unreliable Narrator one?

Hi Guys, I need help and lots of it. My question is can I have the narrator be the young adult in the first chapter without revealing who she is?

Meaning, can my narrator be totally uninvolved with the other characters? Do I have to tell the readers who my narrator is? Hi Tina, Sounds interesting!

My answers are yes, yes, and no. But it sounds like you want her to be a character, just not a character in the main story.

I am toying with having the boat be the narrator — When they first find the boat, it is in poor condition, but they fix her up and set off down the coast.

Over the next 2 years the they encounter may obstacles while he guys work to raise money, and learn how to repair her and what changes need to be made to make her faster etc….

The boat as narrator is a fascinating idea, but it would be tricky, and might strike too whimsical a tone for a true story.

First person — from your own perspective. Sort of half-scrapbook, half-memoir, with quotes from your father as well as your own personal thoughts about the story and why you want to tell it.

How does the story exemplify your dad as you know him? How did it change your perspective of your father? I am not sure if this is ever noted or discussed in literary circles, but I have observed that there is a fuzzy kind of category of third person narrator somewhere between omniscient and the usual sense of limited, and I would love to know if there is a standard name or discussion of it.

What I noticed is that a third person omniscient narrator is supposed to know everything that is happening on all sides AND everything that all the characters are thinking.

However, although many perhaps most third person omniscient narrators will frequently shift from place to place, showing what is happening to different characters, and what different characters are thinking, they will typically limit themselves to the thoughts of a single character at a time — they will not typically shift from head to head in a single scene.

As I said, I think this may actually be the more common case, because I did not even become aware of the distinction until I encountered a book in which the narrator did provide insights into the thoughts of several characters in rapid succession, which I found to be rather disorienting.

Perhaps someone could let me know if a term already exists for this? If not, may I suggest third person flexible indicating a partially limited narrator whose limited viewpoint periodically shifts?

It can be hard to tell who is thinking what. The voices and camera angles differentiate them there. Cass — sannidavidyr3.

How to Fix Your Writing Part 2: Narration — Little Siberia. Thanks for the info it was great for 1 of my classes and its was great with my teacher helping me find this.

Haha, i thought my story was fated to be doomed because i used a weird narrator! This room is pretty boring. White walls, a pimple looking ceiling light, and wooden floors that are probably not even real wood.

On a somewhat unrelated note, is there a specific name for the way Jane Austen wrote or the narrative techniques she used? For example, from Sense and Sensibility: Sir John could not have thought it possible.

Such a good-natured fellow! He did not believe there was a bolder rider in England! It was an unaccountable business.

He wished him at the devil with all his heart. He would not speak another word to him, meet him where he might, for all the world! No, not if it were to be by the side of Barton covert, and they were kept waiting for two hours together.

Such a scoundrel of a fellow! She short of summarizes, or paraphrases, maybe? Thank you so much for this article!

I even stopped writing for a couple of days. Should I use most of the styles in my creation, coz it makes me easy to communicate with readers?

For number six, I was like: Can you name any good examples of getting around this problem? You can use the best adsense alternative for any type of website they approve all websites , for more details simply search in gooogle: Your email address will not be published.

Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. The 7 Narrator Types: Photo by Charles Hutchins.

About Stephanie Orges Stephanie is an award-winning copywriter, aspiring novelist, and barely passable ukulele player. Here, she offers writing prompts, tips, and moderate-to-deep philosophical discussions.

Stephanie Orges September 23, at Writer of Riders June 21, at 6: Stephanie Orges June 21, at 7: Which thing is that?

Brigitta M January 15, at Stephanie Orges January 17, at 8: Blanca Ramirez December 13, at 5: Not what i wanted Reply.

Drew Lane Composer September 10, at 6: Story Sage June 23, at 2: Stephanie Orges June 24, at 9: You should give it a go! On these topics, Dunham is funny, wise, and, yes, brave.

Your version matters more. Dunham is an extraordinary talent, and her vision. Dunham knows about this power, and she has harnessed it.

There are hilarious moments here—I cracked up on a crowded subway reading an essay about her childhood—and disturbing ones, too. Dunham is expert at combining despair and humor.

Dunham lives hers in that gap, welcomes the rest of the world into it with boundless openheartedness, and writes about it with the kind of profound self-awareness and self-compassion that invite us to inhabit our own gaps and maybe even embrace them a little bit more, anguish over them a little bit less.

Lena Dunham is the creator of the critically acclaimed HBO series Girls, for which she also serves as executive producer, writer, and director.

She has been nominated for eight Emmy awards and has won two Golden Globes, including Best Actress, for her work on Girls.

She was the first woman to win the Directors Guild of America award for directorial achievement in comedy. Dunham has also written and directed two feature-length films including Tiny Furniture in and is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker.

She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Joana Avillez is an illustrator and the author of Life Dressing, a tale of two women who live to dress and dress to live.

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Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. Before reading this book, I thought Lena Dunham could do no wrong. I love all three seasons of Girls, I've bought magazines I'd never previously read simply because she graced their covers, and I've read all of her online essays.

This book is, however, too much Lena. While there are flashes of brilliance in the book, like the essays on the hard-to-define rape she suffered, the teacher who tried to sexually abuse her, and the struggles she's had with being taken seriously by male execs in Hollywood, the majority of the book is filled with musings about her life that are simply boring.

I get that Lena believes that standing up and telling your story is the bravest thing anyone can do, but your story has to be interesting in order to be worthy of being published.

That's where this book has gone wrong--the publisher clearly thought that anything written by Lena would be lapped up by readers.

With each individual essay, her editors clearly didn't step back and ask, 'Is this really worth publishing? If they had, the book would be about two-thirds shorter.

The title is also misleading, as Lena does not appear to have learned very much, or rather, she doesn't take much interest in imparting her knowledge to her readers.

This book has primarily taught me that Lena Dunham is excruciatingly self-obsessed and lacking virtually any self-awareness.

She appears to believe that her musings on virtually anything are nothing short of brilliant, no matter how dull and irrelevant the subject matter.

The reprinting of several pages of her food diary is perhaps the best illustration of this --a verbatim regurgitation of what she ate for about a week while she was allegedly on a 'diet' it's really just a pretty standard day's eating for most people is supposed to communicate what exactly?

Her attempts to make even the most mundane interactions with her family appear so powerfully meaningful are odd.

The part where she retells a story about how she and her father got stuck in a traffic jam and experienced frustration because, well, they were in a traffic jam is a perfect example of this.

In this book, Lena seems consumed by a pressing need to convince you that she feels so many more emotions, so much more intensely than anyone else.

She sees quirks and eccentricities in people that others simply cannot comprehend, and you, the reader, need to know that.

She is just so brilliant, you guys, don't you see that from all of her deep introspections on how we're all going to die eventually so what's the point?!

Lena is so overwhelmed by herself in this book that you can't help but feel like you're suffocating while reading it.

This book has killed my love affair with all things Lena Dunham. I admire the work she has done in film and television, no question, and she's an extremely talented writer in both of those genres.

I don't think, however, that she can write at the level required to sustain an entire book. I will view Lena Dunham from afar from now on.

Author Since: Oct 02, 2012